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identity

Where is the Ghanaian Pride?

Posted by gkdapaa on Sat, 04/12/2008 - 04:20

Warning: Objects in this article may appear farther than they really are!


Letter to Osagyefo - the make-up of an African

Posted by Nwia on Thu, 06/07/2007 - 10:39

Yo Osagyefo,
I hope your summer has began a new season in your life and you are revising all the resolutions you made after the Bronya. Makes me wonder though. When you were a student in Yonkee, what did you do during your summers? Did you work at McDonalds or at Chase Manhattan? I am thinking that you were part and parcel of minority America and due to your brilliance you always found something profitable to do with your vacations. But could you really work at McDonalds? I don't know what you make of this - but the 'cool' food to buy these days in Ogyakrom, are burgers and pizza. How the mighty have fallen! Heck, I can't tell who is 'African' anymore! Why blame me? Can you?

Kwame, take for instance your name Kwame. Right off the bat, when I see the name Kwame, booyaka, I say he's Ghanaian. Until, I sacrificed academic work and hanging out with Akua Ataa to follow Kwame Jackson through countless episodes of the first season of Apprentice to find out he was not Ghanaian after all. Mind you, I know countless Ghanaians who have never left Ogyakrom that are called Jackson too, not because they like the guy who sang a song about black and white and cannot be put in either racial category but because that's their surname. Apparently, Mr. Jackson and Mr. Kwame "I can't catch a ball to save my life" Brown have no relation to Ghana except that their parents liked the name Kwame. So next time you see an email from Ike Smith or Afia Bartels, don't think African, just don't think. Obviously, if I saw the name, Ikechukwu Okonkwo, I would know he is Nigerian. However, I have attended countless African student meetings and several African student gatherings, and never met Ikechukwu. Did his father read about some Okonkwo hero in one of Chinua Achebe's books? If Ikechukwu does not want to associate with his people, why hasn't he changed his name? Is Ms. Dike a Dee-kay or a dyke? Oops. I think she should have stayed in Nigeria.


200 YEARS OF SLAVERY, APOLOGIES AND A KISS AT A LONDON THEATRE

Posted by btawiah on Thu, 05/10/2007 - 22:05

You would normally expect the bearer of a typical West African name like Kwame Kwei-Armah to be Ghanaian. Apparently, this intelligent playwright and actor, who has been on my interview list for so long, is not Ghanaian. He is presently involved in the bicentenary celebrations of the abolition of slavery in Britain. I have always been keen on finding out what motivated him to adopt a Ghanaian name. His website says he embarked on a search into his roots and arrived at a total identity change. Kwame is not alone. Trinidadian born Stockley Carmichael has become Kwame Ture, and boxing legend Mohammed Ali, insisted his former identity-Carcius Clay-was a slave name.