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government

President Obour - Having the youth lead now, case study Samuel Okudzeto Ablakwa

Posted by abocco on Sat, 06/27/2009 - 00:28 GhanaThink Managing Executive

Sometime last year, news broke of Obour, a Ghanaian rap artiste, wanting to run for president. It turned out he wasn’t serious about it, but he wondered why ‘young people’ couldn’t run for the highest office in the land. He wanted the minimum age for seeking for the presidency to be reduced from 40. He started a Youth for Presidency campaign saying the constitution was not fair to the youth. Kufuor was more than 60 when he became president and Atta Mills is 64 at the moment. Is the presidency of Ghana for retirees? Maybe it is. We are seeing a youth movement in the present NDC government though, Samuel Okudzeto Ablakwa, an Odadee, is the present deputy minister of information and he is under 30. His age mate, Obour tells us what he would do if he were president in his ‘President Obour’ song. How will the youth handle such responsibility? Do we need more young leaders like Samuel? If we have to pay our dues before we get that type of responsibily, what are those dues?

Bice Osei Kuffour, popularly known as Obour, is one of Ghana’s foremost musicians. He emerged onto the scene with interesting lyrics in his ‘Atenteben’ hit and has continued to remain one of Ghana’s top rappers. He is one of the few hiplife artistes who has a university degree, from the University of Ghana no less. He started his own sports’ bar in the heart of Accra and has other enterprises. He organized one of the best tours ever seen in Ghana, taking his Project Obour.com/Atumpan concert tour to over 35 towns in Ghana. He is also known for his various public campaigns; Road Safety campaign (Okoaba), Peace in Ghana campaign (For Election 2008) and the ABC Ghana Reads campaign. He understands the influence he has as a celebrity and entertainer and is using his fame for socio-economic development and for socially conscious programs.


Kwame Ghana - the personification of our nation

Posted by abocco on Thu, 07/10/2008 - 08:03 GhanaThink Managing Executive

...Sounds on da ground and seens on the see-ins

There has been a lot of controversy in Ghana lately about the recent National Honours Awards and who deserves awards and who should be giving them out. Naturally, we would want 'Ghana' to give out these awards and not the president of the nation or a bunch of people with various interests. So what if Ghana was a person? What would Ghana have to say to its people? If Ghana was a monarchy, the king would be Ghana. We don't have that. My buddy, Okyeame Kwame personifies Ghana in his Kwame Ghana song and tells us what Ghana has to say to its people. 6th march 1957 was a Wednesday while July 1st, 1960 was a Friday. Maybe Kwame Ghana's message sums up the thoughts of Okyeame Kwame, who after all is a Ghanaian as well.


Letta to Osagyefo - Power corrupts and power can overcome corruption as well

Posted by Nwia on Fri, 06/20/2008 - 07:02

Hey Osagyefo,

Please don't put me into your bad books due to this long silence. I have been thinking about you but I was preoccupied with thinking about my classes rather than dedicating time to preparing a letter to you. After all, no one is paying me to do this, but my classes are supposed to get me paid in the future. Eventually. So appreciate my efforts, Kwame, I am not being corrupted. I surely don't need any brown envelopes to share my thoughts on our beloved nation. Now think of those who are actually supposed to serve our nation. It's their job to do it. They are the ones whose jobs have been clouded in the controversy called corruption. It's a canker, but what can we do about it?


Letta to Osagyefo - Using our hard earned tax payers' money

Posted by Nwia on Thu, 03/20/2008 - 11:05

Hello Osagyefo,

I hope you are doing great. I am in my last week in Sikakrom and I am wanting some more days to spend with my family. The thought of when I will see them again after I have returned to Yankee troubles me. A friend told me awhile ago that I have stayed in Ghana far too long so I should leave. The stuff I had in my polythene bag when I returned to Ogyakrom on Christmas Eve is finished. I didn't even pay taxes but the cost of living in Ghana is becoming unbearable for even the returnees. Imagine if I had to pay taxes!


Letta to Osagyefo - Tribute to the Mosquito

Posted by Nwia on Thu, 03/13/2008 - 14:15

Good day Osagyefo,

I told you I'll report back on this year's independence day. I managed to do most of the things I wanted to do. The other highlight was going to the Trade Fair Centre at LA (Labadi). They were having the 12th Ghana Trade fair and there were a lot of good deals. I bought a tourist map with info because I wanted to learn a little more about Ghana's tourism. I happened to chance upon the MKOGH store as well and couldn't resist buying something cuz the sales lady was too nice. I bought a T-shirt that had a quote of yours for half the price. It was a great deal. I bought it in the spirit of independence, whose hard-fought battle was led by you. But Kwame, I shudder to think, did you really win independence for us? Was it not the mosquito?


Africa money - the absence and presence of money in our system

Posted by abocco on Thu, 01/31/2008 - 14:23 GhanaThink Managing Executive

...Sounds on da ground and seens on the see-ins

Many government projects in Ghana are not done according to schedule due to the absence of funds. It's sad to read about infrastructural projects being launched and then the beneficiaries have to wait extra long to benefit. Is there really no money in the system? We pay lots of taxes but we don't see the taxes at work. We see them buying the four-wheel drives, building the nice homes and financing the trips abroad. This is our money, Africa's money and some people are spending it in ways that do not benefit Africa at large. But who will say it? You bet it would be Barima, formerly known as Sidney. The most controversial hiplife artiste is out again and out to criticize the Ogas and bosses chopping Africa money.


Letta to Osagyefo - Who are Ghana's servants and who are the people they are serving?

Posted by Nwia on Fri, 01/11/2008 - 14:56

Dear Osagyefo,

With most of the race tracks for Election 2008 filled and the absence of a defending champion, it's about time we talked about this important race. I am sure you are dying to know who is contesting and who the favorites are, but can we talk about the tatalalicious prize at stake? When you were running the race, were you focused on the fame or the fortune? Did you feel you were running the race for a group of people? What motivated you? As the race ensues, we shall find out more about our runners.

Osagyefo, how come you never ever really talk about your extended family? Who, what and where are your brothers and sisters? You know in this our country, we all claim many people as cousins, uncles and aunts and the system gives us support in times of need and a cheering squad in times of success. The only relatives we know of you are Fathia (may she rest in peace) and your children. Even them, we hear of them once in a blue moon and mostly, when you are in the news. Did you foresee that your family would be invisible in Ghana when you were gone? Would you marry an Egyptian again if you had the chance?


Letter to Osagyefo - the leader we need: who, what, how, and why

Posted by Nwia on Wed, 12/19/2007 - 11:37

Yo Osagyefo,
I know it's been a while since you heard from me. It's not me o, I have been busier than the busiest Chinese fast food joint in Osu. The times have not been good, I haven't been inspired to write to you and it's something I can't even explain. You know what else I can't explain, the fact that we have 17 candidates all vying for the opportunity to run for the president of Ghana through the New Patriotic Party. Osagyefo, you need a couple more hands to count 17, only one person shall win the slot, and 16 people would have gotten nought from a 250 million cedi investment. I know you'll be wondering how 17 different people in Ogyakrom could get 250 mill, but massa, these are the times.

You may also be wondering what happened to your brain child, the Convention People's Party. Kwame, why was Convention such a popular word in those days? What does it mean? Because these days when the regular golden boy or girl hears convention, the first thought that comes to mind is a Christian gathering with thousands of people receiving miracles from above. You could ask Efo Mawugbe and he'll tell you too, if the CPP of today wins the next Ghanaian election, that will be a miracle from above. Osagyefo, send down a miracle if you would.


Pioto - challenging and setting up ourselves to do better

Posted by abocco on Fri, 12/07/2007 - 10:45 GhanaThink Managing Executive

...Sounds on da ground and seens on the see-ins

It's been a while since I blogged here and I am ashamed. Anyway, I am back. :-) What's driven me back? The upcoming African Cup of Nations Football tournament in Ghana - yes, I am excited. It is expected to draw 1 million tourists to Ghana, which is more than we got all through 2007 probably and it is bound to infuse a lot into our economy. Ghana has rehabilitated two stadiums and built two new ones for the tournament and there have been some infrastructural developments as well. You can ask around, even though people are excited about these developments, a lot of people feel the government could and should have done more. Why can't we do something great while we are at it? Who is asking? Amandzeba Nat Brew does in his Pioto song, his most recent hit.


A letter to parliament - Reflecting on Ghana@50, government and the nation

Posted by abocco on Wed, 04/18/2007 - 06:05 GhanaThink Managing Executive

...Sounds on da ground and seens on the see-ins

A lot of people have discussed Ghana's golden jubilee celebrations with the discussion centering on the cost and amount of money being spent, the present state of the nation, how our age-mates are more industrialized than we are, etc. I doubt our voices were heard by the people in power but I know one person whose voice has been heard loud and clear. When the said person receives "death threats", you know that is some serious business. Kwame Asare Obeng aka A-Plus is serious about his song as well and he calls it A Letter to Parliament. A-Plus has been singing and rapping about politics in Ghana for a number of years now, but what is different about this song?


I want to see you my father - family and national priorities

Posted by abocco on Mon, 11/20/2006 - 12:11 GhanaThink Managing Executive

...Sounds on da ground and seens on the see-ins

King Ayisoba's I want to see you my father is probably most talked about song in Ghana at the moment. I am not sure why this is the case, but Ayisoba's sound is different and quite traditional. Maybe it is because the song's in English? Talking about English, our teachers mounted a two month strike that brought secondary education to a standstill. The issue of strikes is probably the biggest news out of Ghana and right after the National Association of Graduate Teachers (NAGRAT) decided to call it off, the health workers are threathening positive action as well. Ayisoba's major hit is not a silly song with strange instrumentals, it is quite deep when you pay attention to the lyrics.