User login

Shout Box

There are no shouts to view.
Login or register to post shouts
All Shouts

Recent comments

Who's new

  • Acma
  • nxkwwwblazerod
  • translatornauseating
  • fidelisadjei
  • baronfake

education

The stories of two adult students in a Ghanaian village

Posted by sankofacrafts on Sat, 07/03/2010 - 17:03

Eric was our ‘technical man’ on the Platform2 worksite and seemed a stern, silent figure at first, observing our noodle-armed efforts to dig and occasionally stepping in with patient resignation to pulverize the rock hard earth with a pickaxe. (We volunteers were joyful and eager workers of course but even the skinniest of Ghanaians had superhuman strength beyond most of us)

Not being one to let a potential Twi lesson slip away I made use of cement mixing time getting him to teach me how to say “what time is it?” and “have we finished?” and other whiny work-related questions. He thawed fast and was soon mockingly exhorting us poor, tired souls to “DIG!” while we rallied with our newfound vocabulary “lazy” “crazy” and “you want to kill me!”


The Senior High School in Ghana duration debate - 3 or 4 years?

Posted by abocco on Wed, 02/03/2010 - 03:03 GhanaThink Managing Executive

Blog culled from Mighty African's blog

I am a very proud Odadee. My alma mater, Presec and its current and old students, have given me reason to. When I was in Ghana earlier in this year, I visited Presec to see what was new. A lot has changed since I left Presec more than 8 years ago. My favorite teacher, Mrs. Akyeampong has retired, there's been a new headmaster, the bursar who refused to give us funds to publish the school magazine embezzled money and got sacked, the buildings have been painted, we've won 4 National Science and Maths quizzes and the name has been changed from Presby Boys' Secondary School to Presby Boys' Senior High School. Presecans were going to stay in 'blue magic' for 4 years. But in the 'politics democrazy' country that is Ghana, anything can happen. Senior High School is now 3 years again and as a result, senior secondary or senior high school students will not write the WASSCE this year. Crazy eh? There's been a big debate about the number of years senior high school should be. Let's study some of the arguments for and against, debate style.


I ask for more Patrick Awuahs and more Ashesis in this life

Posted by abocco on Fri, 11/13/2009 - 10:42 GhanaThink Managing Executive

Earlier tonight, I met Patrick Awuah. Again. Up close. This is the second time I am dedicating a blog entry to him. Why not? He's awesome. He gives me goosebumps when I meet him. Yes. Sounds weird. I told my roommates I had a crush on him. Oui. Of course, I am straight and straight up drumming home the point that we need more Patrick Awuahs in this world. If you didn't know already. But the focus of this entry is really about what he talked about tonight. What brought him to this area so I could be in the same room as him is not important. His words, actions, character are. Let's dig into what he said.

As some of you may know, Patrick and Ashesi University just won the Aspen Institute's McNulty Prize for 2009. Doesn't matter to me how relevant or prestiguous the prize is, but the fact that Patrick has yet another honour. Judges choosing the McNulty Prize included Madeleine Albright, Bill Gates, and Olara Otunnu; go figure. He won $100,000, a nice sum of money that will go a long way. It felt quite good to congratulate him in person, just a week after I had heard of his award from an Ashesi mailing list. The prize was in the conscience of most of the 30 or so students who gathered earlier tonight to have an evening with Patrick and Patrick started the night off with a short film prepared about Ashesi University which won him the prize. The film told a few stories Patrick had mentioned when I met him earlier this year and this is a time to share.


Help required PLEASE

Posted by Naz on Mon, 08/17/2009 - 11:28

I am very interested in learning TWI and have volunteered in Ghana twice and would like to be able to converse with Ghanaian people in TWI when I visit again. I wanted to ask if you migt have any materials I could borrow in this endeavour and any tips you may have.
My email add: szindagi@hotmail.com

Medasi

Naz


Patrick Awuah, founder of Ashesi University and educating a new generation of African leaders

Posted by abocco on Wed, 05/06/2009 - 10:32 GhanaThink Managing Executive

When my friend sent me an email asking if I wanted to attend a lunch with Patrick Awuah, I was ecstatic. I had met Patrick before, at the Harvard Business School African Business Conference in 2005 but being able to get this face-to-face time over a free meal was too good to pass up. Patrick Awuah is my hero. I tried to tell him when I saw him but I don't know if he understood the gravity of my statement. Patrick is the kind of person most of us must aspire to; an individual whose heart is set on Africa's development, has taken, continues to take steps to realise the African dream. What has Patrick done to deserve my awe? He started the Ashesi University, a model university in Accra which is setting the pace for educating the next generation of African leaders, entrepreneurs, etc.


Kookoo aduro - traditional, herbal medicine and curing AIDS

Posted by abocco on Tue, 05/15/2007 - 10:58 GhanaThink Managing Executive

...Sounds on da ground and seens on the see-ins

My first reaction was to laugh it off. Ghanaweb is at it again, sensationalising another headline. But as I continued to read, it sounded more 'authentic'. Besides, I have strong beliefs in traditional medicine and KNUST was ever present in this scenario. We have heard all the facts about HIV-AIDS but with the recent pronouncement from Gambia about a cure/treatment and now with this revelation from Kumasi (Ghana), should we paying some more attention and giving more credit to traditional medicine? 4x4's Kookoo Aduro is a tribute to our herbalists and medicine men.


Jacket - what you come back for, the Diasporean Ghanaian

Posted by abocco on Sun, 01/21/2007 - 15:00 GhanaThink Managing Executive

...Sounds on da ground and seens on the see-ins

One of the songs my cousin used to sing frequently when I was in Ghana last Christmas was Jacket by Praye (wOama yEayi me jacket). I got hooked onto the song for a bit, but I only started listening to it a lot when I came back to the USA. There's this line that is now synonymous with the song, 'What you come back for'. A lot of my friends in Ghana constanly ask me when I would be returning to Ghana, for good. I have thought about this question many times but when I have to give a response, I am not articulate aout it. So really, why haven't I gone back to Ghana already and what's stopping me?


P1 (Class 1) - Making sure everybody goes to school

Posted by abocco on Fri, 09/01/2006 - 15:00 GhanaThink Managing Executive

...Sounds on da ground and seens on the see-ins

It's that time of year again; first-year students are thronging the campuses of Tech (KNUST), Legon, UCC, etc while last-year senior secondary students have just completed their SSCE exams. Inevitably, some students would fail to make the cut to enter the tertiary institutions and this realisation hit me when I was listening to Okomfo Kwaadee's 'P1', a song on his latest album, 'Nsem pii'. P1 stands for 'primary 1' or the very first year in elementary school. Take a moment to think about the number of youth in Ghana who will be unable to go to school because they are unable to pay. And picture what the idle minds and hands are doing with their time.